Public Broadcasting

The U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1 early this morning, which eliminates federal funding for public broadcasting. This is a blow to public radio and television stations across the country and the 170 million Americans who tune in every month.

Now the bill heads to the Senate. Send a clear message to Washington: Funding for public broadcasting is too important to eliminate.

What can you do today? Please reach out to your friends and family and encourage them to sign up at 170MillionAmericans.org and at Facebook.com/170Million over the coming week. This is going to be a marathon and we will need any many supporters as possible to prevail in the end.

In 2010, Americans rated public broadcasting as an “excellent” use of taxpayer dollars, second only to defense spending.

America’s unique public broadcasting system is a collaboration of 1,300 local non-commercial radio and television stations that meet the standards of and are supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

America’s public broadcasters do not rely upon the government as their primary source of funding. On average, federal funding amounts to less than 14% of a station’s budget, with the remaining 86% coming from local sources

While commercial television stations air on average 4 hours of children’s programming each week, public television stations air a minimum of 7 hours of non-commercial children’s programming each day.

Some critics claim that public broadcasting has a “liberal bias,” the vast majority of public broadcasting has no clear-cut agenda — from Nova, Nature, Antique Roadshow, Masterpiece to Car Talk and Sesame Street — it’s simply thoughtful, well-produced content. See http://www.pbs.org/ and http://www.npr.org/

Get involved

http://www.170millionamericans.org/why-public-broadcasting

~ by Meg on February 19, 2011.

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